The Ajanta Cave

The Ajanta Cave

The Ajanta Caves comprises of 30 rock cut Bhuddhist caves. It is located about 106 km from Aurangabad. The basic designs of the caves are called ‘Chaitya grihas’ and ‘Viharas’. Five caves are Buddhist cathedrals and the remaining 25 are monasteries. The Chaityas are large, rectangular chambers separated by rows of pillars. They are decorated by sculptures and murals which depict the many incarnations of Buddha. The Vhharas are rectangular shaped halls. They have series of small cells which are attached on both sides. Opposite to the entrance is an image of Buddha. The caves also include a visual form of the life of Buddha and interesting stories from Jatakas.

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Ajanta Caves

 Ajanta Caves

Ajanta Caves top the list of favorites when one visits Aurangabad. Declared as World Heritage Site by UNESCO, Ajanta Caves have been visited by tourists from all parts of the world. The mural paintings in Ajanta Caves display unique style that cannot be seen in any part of the world. The paintings depict the events on the life of Buddha and there are illustrations on Buddhist deities. The stunning paintings reveal the skills and artistry of the artists and they effectively narrate the events without the need for words. A lot of researches were undertaken to learn about the mystery behind the life of paintings. The paintings have withstood the test of time and the colors are fresh and glowing. Image credit @ Ashok666 & danchitnis.

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Ellora Caves

 Ellora Caves

Ellora[pronunciation?] (Marathi: वेरूळ Vērūḷa) is an archaeological site, 29 km (18 mi) North-West of the city of Aurangabad in the Indian state of Maharashtra built by the Rashtrakuta dynasty. It is also known as Elapura (in the Rashtrakuta literature-Kannada). Well known for its monumental caves, Ellora is a World Heritage Site.[1] Ellora represents the epitome of Indian rock-cut architecture. The 34 \"caves\" are actually structures excavated out of the vertical face of the Charanandri hills. Buddhist, Hindu and Jain rock-cut temples and viharas and mathas were built between the 5th century and 10th century. The 12 Buddhist (caves 1–12), 17 Hindu (caves 13–29) and 5 Jain (caves 30–34) caves, built in proximity, demonstrate the religious harmony prevalent during this period of Indian history.[2] It is a protected monument under the Archaeological Survey of India.[3]

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Panchakki

 Panchakki

Panchakki,(Devanagari: पानचक्की) also known as the water mill, takes its name from the mill which used to grind grain for the pilgrims. This monument located in Aurangabad, Maharastra, displays the scientific thought process put in medieval Indian architecture. It was designed to generate energy via water brought down from a spring on a mountain. The building, attached to the dargah of Baba Shah Musafir a Sufi saint is located in a garden near the Mahmud Darvaza and consist of a mosque, a madrissa, a kacheri, a minister\'s house, a sarai and houses for zananas.

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Gates in Aurangabad, Maharashtra

Gates in Aurangabad, Maharashtra

One of the things that made Aurangabad stand out from several other medieval cities in India was its 52 \"gates\", each of which had a local history or had individuals linked with it. Aurangabad is known as the \"City of Gates\". Out of the 52, only four main and nine subordinate gates have survived, the most famous, oldest and biggest of them being the Bhadkal Gate near the Naukhanda Palace of Nizams.

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Naukhanda palace

Naukhanda palace

Naukhanda palace From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Entrance of Naukonda palace, Aurangabad The Naukhanda palace was built by Malik Ambar in 1616 upon the summit of a rising ground at Aurangabad, India. The massive portal gateway leading to this, over which the Naubatkhana sounded, was called Barkal. According to one account a noble of Aurangzeb’s court named Alam Khan, made additions to this Palace; and further additions were subsequently made by Asaf Jah I. An adjoining block of buildings was screened off by a partition wall for Nasir Jang. The Naukonda palace was also occupied by Nizam Ali Khan, when he was at Aurangabad. The palace had nine apartments, the interior buildings consisted of five zananas, a Divan i Aam, a Divan i Khas, a masjid and a kacheri, each provided with a garden and a cistern. The walls of the central part of the Devankhana, and a hamam or hot bath attached to the building, are in a fair state of preservation. However, the wood-work and the stucc

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Bhadkal Gate, Delhi Gate,Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Rosha

Bhadkal Gate, Delhi Gate,Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Rosha

When Aurangzeb made Aurangabad his capital, there were 54 suburbs which were walled in like the city itself, the chief of these were Begampura and Aurangpura. During Khan Jahan\'s second viceroyalty, Aurangzeb built a wall round the city in 1682, to protect it from the incursions of the Marathas; and in 1696 he erected a similar fortified wall for Begumpura. The city wall is terraced, and is of solid masonry, but of no great height, being in many parts not more than fourteen feet. The battlements are loop-holed, and the merlins over the gateways and at certain places along the wall, are machicolated; while semi-circular bastions surmounted by towers, occur at each flanking angle, and at regular intervals along the works. The wall is pierced with thirteen gateways, exclusive of a small postern wicket, and its total length is a little over six miles. All gates barring one are associated with Aurangzeb. The four principal entrances face the cardinal points, and consist of the Delhi

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Bhadkal Gate, Delhi Gate,Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Rosha

Bhadkal Gate, Delhi Gate,Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Rosha

When Aurangzeb made Aurangabad his capital, there were 54 suburbs which were walled in like the city itself, the chief of these were Begampura and Aurangpura. During Khan Jahan\'s second viceroyalty, Aurangzeb built a wall round the city in 1682, to protect it from the incursions of the Marathas; and in 1696 he erected a similar fortified wall for Begumpura. The city wall is terraced, and is of solid masonry, but of no great height, being in many parts not more than fourteen feet. The battlements are loop-holed, and the merlins over the gateways and at certain places along the wall, are machicolated; while semi-circular bastions surmounted by towers, occur at each flanking angle, and at regular intervals along the works. The wall is pierced with thirteen gateways, exclusive of a small postern wicket, and its total length is a little over six miles. All gates barring one are associated with Aurangzeb. The four principal entrances face the cardinal points, and consist of the Delhi

Read more

Bhadkal Gate, Delhi Gate,Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Rosha

Bhadkal Gate, Delhi Gate,Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Rosha

When Aurangzeb made Aurangabad his capital, there were 54 suburbs which were walled in like the city itself, the chief of these were Begampura and Aurangpura. During Khan Jahan\'s second viceroyalty, Aurangzeb built a wall round the city in 1682, to protect it from the incursions of the Marathas; and in 1696 he erected a similar fortified wall for Begumpura. The city wall is terraced, and is of solid masonry, but of no great height, being in many parts not more than fourteen feet. The battlements are loop-holed, and the merlins over the gateways and at certain places along the wall, are machicolated; while semi-circular bastions surmounted by towers, occur at each flanking angle, and at regular intervals along the works. The wall is pierced with thirteen gateways, exclusive of a small postern wicket, and its total length is a little over six miles. All gates barring one are associated with Aurangzeb. The four principal entrances face the cardinal points, and consist of the Delhi

Read more

Bhadkal Gate, Delhi Gate,Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Rosha

Bhadkal Gate, Delhi Gate,Paithan Gate, Mecca or Makai Gate, Khas or Jalna Gate, Kaala Darwaza, Rosha

When Aurangzeb made Aurangabad his capital, there were 54 suburbs which were walled in like the city itself, the chief of these were Begampura and Aurangpura. During Khan Jahan\'s second viceroyalty, Aurangzeb built a wall round the city in 1682, to protect it from the incursions of the Marathas; and in 1696 he erected a similar fortified wall for Begumpura. The city wall is terraced, and is of solid masonry, but of no great height, being in many parts not more than fourteen feet. The battlements are loop-holed, and the merlins over the gateways and at certain places along the wall, are machicolated; while semi-circular bastions surmounted by towers, occur at each flanking angle, and at regular intervals along the works. The wall is pierced with thirteen gateways, exclusive of a small postern wicket, and its total length is a little over six miles. All gates barring one are associated with Aurangzeb. The four principal entrances face the cardinal points, and consist of the Delhi

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Himayat Baugh

Himayat Baugh

Himayat Bagh is a 17th-century garden that now houses the Fruit Research Station and Nursery, which is a part of the Marathwada Agricultural University. It is located near Delhi Gate in Rauza Bagh area of Aurangabad. It is a sprawling complex spread over 300 acres (1.2 km2), naturally green and in the olden days it was known as the Mughal garden.[1]

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Salim Ali Lake

Salim Ali Lake

Salim Ali Sarovar (lake) popularly known as Salim Ali Talab is located near Delhi Gate, opposite Himayat Bagh, Aurangabad. It is located in the northern part of the city. During the Mughal period it was known as Khiziri Talab. It has been renamed after the great ornithologist and naturalist Salim Ali. The office of Divisional Commissioner Aurangabad Division is located near it, so is the collector\'s office of Aurangabad District.

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Aurangabad Caves

Aurangabad Caves

The Aurangabad caves (Marathi :औरंगाबाद लेणी) are 12 artificial rock-cut Buddhist shrines located on a hill running roughly east to west, nearly 2 km north from Bibi Ka Maqbara in Aurangabad, Maharashtra. The first reference of Aurangabad Caves is cited in the big Chaitya of Kanheri. The Aurangabad Caves were dug out of comparatively soft basalt rock during the 6th and 7th century. Caves are divided into three separate groups depending on their location. Sculptural carvings of Aurangabad Caves reached belong to highest achievements of Indian classical art and can be compared to the best paintings of Ajanta.

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Jama Masjid, Aurangabad

Jama Masjid, Aurangabad

The Jama Masjid is a mosque built in 1612 AD, located near the Killa Arrak in Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India. It is historicly significant because it was constructed in 1612 AD,[1] very soon after the foundation of Aurangabad (then called \"Khadki\") by Malik Amber in 1610 AD. The mosque was later extended by Aurangzeb in the year 1692 AD, it is one of the oldest mosques of Aurangabad which is still in good condition.

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Daulatabad

Daulatabad

Daulatabad is a 14th-century fort city in Maharashtra, India, about 16 kilometers northwest of Aurangabad. The place, was once as known as Devagiri,[1] circa the sixth century AD, when it was an important uplands city along caravan routes and is now but a village, based around the former city of the same name. Starting 1327, it famously remained the capital of Tughlaq dynasty, under Muhammad bin Tughluq (r. 1325-1351), who also changed its name, and forcibily moved the entire population of Delhi here, for two years, before it was abandoned due to lack of water. There is a tradition that Deoghur or Doulatabad was built in 1203 AD by a Dhangar or herdsman who acquiring by some unusual good fortune vast wealth was named by his brother shepherds Rajah Ram and soon after assumed the rank of a Rajah.[2]

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Khuldabad

Khuldabad

Khuldabad ([xʊld̪aːˈbaːd̪]) is a city (municipal council) and a Taluka of Aurangabad district in the Indian state of Maharashtra. Initially it was known as \"Rauzaa\" as meaning garden of paradise. It is known as the Valley of Saints, or the Abode of Eternity, because in the 14th century, several Sufi saints chose to reside here. The dargah of Zar Zari Zar Baksh, Shaikh Burhan ud-din Gharib Chisti and Shaikh Zain-ud-din Shirazi, along with the tomb of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb and his trusted general Asif Jah I, the first Nizam of Hyderabad, are located in this town. Malik Ambar\'s Tomb 1860s Khuldabad Zainuddin Shirzai Maqbara Khuldabad The place has famous Bhadra Maruti Temple. People come from Aurangabad and nearby places by walk for offering puja on Hanuman Jayanti and on Saturdays in Marathi calendar month \"Shravan\".[1] Nearby is the Valley of the Saints, which is purported to contain the graves of 1500 Sufi saints.

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Jayakwadi Dam

Jayakwadi Dam

ayakwadi project (Marathi: जायकवाडी प्रकल्प) is one of the largest irrigation projects in the Indian state of Maharashtra. It is a multipurpose project. The water is used mainly to irrigate agricultural land in the drought-prone Marathwada region of the state. It also provides water for drinking and industrial usage to nearby towns and villages and to the municipalities and industrial areas of Aurangabad and Jalna district. The surrounding area of the dam has a garden and a bird sanctua

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Dnyaneshwar Udyan

Dnyaneshwar Udyan

Jnaneshwar Udyan or Dnyaneshwar Udyan is a garden in Maharashtra resembling the Brindavan Gardens near Mysore. It is situated by Nathsagar, the reservoir formed by the Jayakwadi Dam. It is located in the ancient town of Paithan which is 40 km south of Aurangabad. Out of an area of 125 hectares, orchids cover 26 hectares and 28 hectares are laid out as parks. Colourful flowerbeds, vast lawns and musical fountains are the attractions of the udyan. Ten plazas and twenty-two fountains are added features. More than a hundred thousand trees, in addition to the forty thousand fruit trees are the pride of the garden. There is also a nursery selling saplings and spices. It also has a children\'s play area, swimming pool and boat rides. It is named after the saint Jnaneshwar, whose native village was near Paithan. Migratory birds at Jayakwadi Dam, Aurangabad The lake of Nathsagar spread over 350 km² is a sanctuary for migratory flamingoes and other birds. Male Masjid is near the gard

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Ajanta Caves

Ajanta Caves

Ajanta Caves top the list of favorites when one visits Aurangabad. Declared as World Heritage Site by UNESCO, Ajanta Caves have been visited by tourists from all parts of the world. The mural paintings in Ajanta Caves display unique style that cannot be seen in any part of the world. The paintings depict the events on the life of Buddha and there are illustrations on Buddhist deities. The stunning paintings reveal the skills and artistry of the artists and they effectively narrate the events without the need for words. A lot of researches were undertaken to learn about the mystery behind the life of paintings. The paintings have withstood the test of time and the colors are fresh and glowing. Image credit

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Ellora Caves

Ellora Caves

Ellora Caves throw light on the tolerance of the people of ancient India who were ready to accommodate other beliefs and faiths. Ellora Caves are spaced over 2 kilometers and there are 34 caves representing three religions namely Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism. The monuments date between 600 A.D. and 1000 A.D. All the 34 temples and monasteries were dug adjacent to each other in the walls of a cliff. The first 12 caves are Buddhist Caves and they are the oldest. The next 17 caves are the Hindu Caves. The last 5 caves are Jain Caves. The architectural expertise and the efforts taken by the artisans in constructing buildings out of rocks have no words to admire enough.

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Ghrishneshwar Temple

Ghrishneshwar Temple

Ghrishneshwar Temple belongs to 18th century. It is just half a kilometer from Ellora Caves. The marvelous architecture is awe-inspiring though you cannot hope to see the complete ancient architecture here owing to the damage caused by Aurangazeb. A peaceful place and it is frequented by tourists, as it is one of the twelve Siva temples.

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Khuldabad

Khuldabad

The place is a holy shrine for Muslims. It is a wonderful place surrounded by mountains and it offers scenic view. The city walls constructed by Aurangazeb were ruined and you could see ruins of ancient buildings. The Tombs of Aurangazeb, Khan Jahan’s Lal Bagh and various other Tombs are found here.

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Pitalkhora Caves

Pitalkhora Caves

You will love the location of Pitalkhora Caves. They are located in the most picturesque setting under the valley. It consists of 14 Buddhist Caves. They are grouped into two sets with the first group consisting of 10 caves and the second group consisting of 4 caves. You can find traces of excellent paintings here. The architecture and sculpture are beyond words. Aurangabad offers you clear insight into the glories of the past and the effects of wars as well. The cultural heritage and the architectural excellence of the early days and the centuries old monuments are something that remains in your memory forever. You will love the tourist places of Aurangabad for the stunning landscapes and the show of excellence in various art forms.

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